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Life Cycle of plastics in your Home

by Clensta International on April 23, 2021

Plastic! It’s everywhere. It has only really existed for the last 60-70 years, but in that time plastic has transformed everything from packaging to product design and retailing.

One of the advantages of plastic is that it is designed to last, but this same blessing is a curse as nearly all the plastic ever created still exists in some form today.

India, the world's second-most populous country, generates around 5.6 million tonnes of plastic waste annually; where India generates nearly 26,000 tonnes of plastic waste every day, making it the 15th biggest plastic polluter globally. With the Waterless technology and its reusable bottles, Clensta helps to reduce the 11 kgs average plastic consumption of Indian individuals per year to 80% single-use plastic packaging consumption of Indian individuals per year, which is 2.2 kgs.

A major environmental issue with plastics is their ultimate fate after disposal. Due to their low density they often end up floating in bodies of water. The currents in the Pacific Ocean have tended to gather all this plastic into a mass swirling off the coast of Alaska. Not only is this mess unsightly, but it can be harmful to aquatic life as well. Researchers are working on dealing with this "Ocean of Trash". Read on to uncover fact and fiction around this issue.

Plastic! It’s everywhere. It has only really existed for the last 60-70 years, but in that time plastic has transformed everything from packaging to product design and retailing.

One of the advantages of plastic is that it is designed to last, but this same blessing is a curse as nearly all the plastic ever created still exists in some form today.

India, the world's second-most populous country, generates around 5.6 million tonnes of plastic waste annually; where India generates nearly 26,000 tonnes of plastic waste every day, making it the 15th biggest plastic polluter globally. With the Waterless technology and its reusable bottles, Clensta helps to reduce the 11 kgs average plastic consumption of Indian individuals per year to 80% single-use plastic packaging consumption of Indian individuals per year, which is 2.2 kgs.

A major environmental issue with plastics is their ultimate fate after disposal. Due to their low density they often end up floating in bodies of water. The currents in the Pacific Ocean have tended to gather all this plastic into a mass swirling off the coast of Alaska. Not only is this mess unsightly, but it can be harmful to aquatic life as well. Researchers are working on dealing with this "Ocean of Trash". Read on to uncover fact and fiction around this issue.

Plastic Straws - 200 years

Plastic bags pose one of the greatest impacts to ocean wildlife. Even though they only make up a small percentage of our litter, they can break up into smaller and smaller pieces - having devastating impacts on our wildlife.

Plastic Straws - 200 years

Plastic straws can take up to 200 years to decompose. Choose a paper straw to ditch them altogether and try the age-old sipping technique.

Plastic Bottles - 450 years

The energy required to produce and transport plastic water bottles could fuel an estimated 1.5 million cars for a year, yet approximately 75% of water bottles are not recycled - they end up in landfills, litter roadsides, and pollute waterways and oceans.

Plastic Toothbrush - 450 years

3.5 billion toothbrushes are sold worldwide each year. Most get lost in the recycling process and end up in landfill or make their way into rivers and oceans. These toothbrushes are made from polypropylene plastic and nylon and can take up to 500 years or more to decompose.

Source reduction activities reduce the consumption of resources at the point of generation. In general, source reduction activities include:

  • Redesigning products or packages so as to reduce the quantity of the materials used, by substituting lighter materials for heavier ones or lengthening the life of products to postpone disposal.
  • Using packaging that reduces the amount of damage or spoilage to the product.
  • Reducing amounts of products or packages used through modification of current practices by processors and consumers.
  • Reusing products or packages already manufactured.
  • Managing non-product organic wastes (food wastes, yard trimmings) through backyard composting or other on-site alternatives to disposal.
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